Dropping studies at higher education and the benefits of continuing

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Dropping studies at higher education and the benefits of continuing

Having a significant number of students dropping studies at higher education means a great loss of the investment done for their development, and limits their possibilities of having better employment opportunities.

In Chile, higher education coverage has increased significantly. In 2006, according to the figures from The Ministry of Education net coverage was of 34%. In 2010, it was over 40%. In 1990 there were 245,000 young people signed up in an undergraduate career, in 2009 numbers rocketed up to 810,000.

This massive system has generated new necessities from the students to satisfactorily face their Higher Education step, and the little amount of adaptation that some educational institutions have shown towards this, is probably one of the main reasons for students abandoning their studies.

Having a significant number of students dropping their studies means a great loss of the investment done towards their development, limits their possibilities of having better employment opportunities and also means a considerable economical loss for the institutions.

In Chile, according to the investigation done by the Higher Education Information Service HEIS, from the Ministry Of Education Chile, the desertion figures are around 30% of all first-year students, with this figure increasing up to 43% in the 2nd year. Although an important number of them get back to the system in later years, they sign into other careers or join other educational institutions.

The research also shows that the re-entry process varies significantly according to the type of institution and career. Here the deserters’ short-term re-entry process is higher at Universities (closer to 54%) than in Colleges and Technical schools, where the re-entry percentage is 38.9% and 31.9% respectively. Thus re-entry is higher in professional careers (51.9%) than in technical ones (32.3%).

Student retention is one the biggest concerns of The Ministry of Education Chile and of all the members of the Higher Education system. Low desertion rates reduce the cost for students and their families, taking into consideration the money invested without students getting a degree, in addition to leading to frustrations and non-accomplished expectancies. Besides, this generates an effective increase in social mobility. Universities and educational institutions are also getting benefits as this fact decreases the Empty Room Phenomena in the higher years.

The final goal of every student is not only to enter Higher Education, but also stay in a career and accomplish the curricular programs to become a professional.

I would love to hear your feedback about dropping studies at higher education and the benefits of continuing. Leave a comment below.

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